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Tag Archives: Entertainment

It Takes You Away review- Just watch this one… just watch it

Do you know why I love Doctor Who? The ideas. Over 55 years this show has always striven to be the most imaginative, daring and bold television show on the planet. Stories that focus entirely on ideas are among my favourites- Tom Baker’s Warrior’s Gate is a wonderful piece of science fiction, Kinda and Enlightenment are my two favourite Peter Davison stories, The God Complex dissects the Doctor’s character by forcing him to battle the very idea of narrative and Ghost Light, the infamously complex and divisive story from the original run’s final season, is one of my all time favourite stories in anything ever. Whilst Series 11 has so far been strong on character and stories, in terms of pure ideas it’s been a bit behind. Until tonight. It Takes You Away (I assume the title refers to how the episode blows your mind) is not only the best episode of the series by a long shot (and remember, I consider both Rosa and Demons of the Punjab to be masterpieces and like everything else barring Tsuranga Conundrum) but one of the most original, bonkers, crazy, delightful, imaginative, complex and heartfelt stories the show has done in a looooong time, perhaps ever. Ed Hime, take a bow.

After being explained the script multiple times Bradley Walsh was still confused.

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The Witchfinders review- I missed a week!

Whoops, I missed a week. Events such as college, college and college prevented me from writing a Kerblam! review but in short: loved it, most fun episode since The Crimson Horror, bring Twirly back as a companion, Pete McTighe needs to write more episodes and it should have been episode 5. Now onto this week’s episode, The Witchfinders, which I’ve been anticipating for a while. I love historical episodes and the witch trials are a fascinating period of English history. With a female Doctor this premise promised great things and the episode even secured probably the biggest guest star since John Hurt with Alan Cumming (known to nerds like me as Nightcrawler from X-Men 2) as King James I & VI (it’s complicated). Fortunately this episode lived up to the hype by being a return to traditional Who- monsters, history and horror combining in a gloriously entertaining episode with one amazing guest role. Chris Chibnall may be an excellent showrunner, but he should really leave the majority of the writing to guest writers. Joy Wilkinson gets Who.

Alan Cumming wonders how much scenery he can chew in a single take.

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Demons of the Punjab review- A welcome return to form

Question- what did we do to deserve this series? Seriously, we were lucky to have one era-defining historical story but to have two? The conspiracy theorist thinks Chibnall made last week deliberately “meh” in order to make us savour something with substance, and something with substance we got. Demons of the Punjab is a wonderful episode that encapsulates everything brilliant about this show and deals with a difficult subject matter with skill and precision. I dare say it’s even better than Rosa, but I’ll need to rewatch it. Rather than stick an alien invasion plot in the middle of a controversial period of history, Vinay Patel takes a complex, multi layered look at war, remembrance and religion.

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The Tsuranga Condundrum review- Of all the Doctor Who episodes, this is one of them

The Peter Davison story The Awakening is neither good nor bad. It exists as a story of Doctor Who. The same can be said for this week’s episode, The Tsuranga Conundrum. For the first time since I don’t even know, we have an episode that really gives me no real emotion either way. Was it an exemplary piece of television? No. Was it a disaster? No. It simply was. It’s Schrodinger’s episode.

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An ever so slightly late Arachnids in the UK review

On Netflix there’s about 100 various b-movies, mainly from the 80’s that are incredibly obscure and cheesy. I mention this because this week’s Doctor Who was essentially a b-movie with a budget. After three quite serious weeks we had a chance to see this new team loosen up and engage with a sterotypical monster of the week plot befitting of the Pertwee era. In a week that was quite intense for me having to hand in my English coursework (hence the late review), a fun nonsensical Doctor Who episode was a great way to start the week and a fun, nonsensical episode we got.

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The Ghost Monument review: Chibnall goes old school

After last week’s epic introduction to the Thirteenth Doctor, Chris Chibnall has restored Doctor Who to a level of popularity not seen since the 50th anniversary. He has followed this up with a fairly risky episode (although not as risky as next week… oh boy…) which evokes the show’s beginnings- The Ghost Monument is an incredibly slow burning episode, evoking the show’s early epics like The Keys of Marinus and creating a fully fledged alien world for the characters to learn to adapt to. Whilst not as impactful as last week’s this was a nice exploration episode that focused on making these disparate individuals work together.

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Every Doctors’ first story- Which one’s the best?

In four days time, the world will be introduced to Jodie Whittaker as the Thirteenth Doctor. I cannot wait, and I eagerly anticipate this new era. Following an era that- Series 10 and the beauty that it is aside- I couldn’t enjoy as much as I usually do, to have a fresh new start with a new Doctor, new companions and a new showrunner is simply glorious. The Woman Who Fell to Earth is the first episode for the Thirteenth Doctor, and it’s important to have a good first impression. Whilst I have faith that Chris Chibnall will give us a great first episode (although I am far more excited for the more intriguing sounding Episode 2), there has unfortunately been precedent in the past for less than stellar first stories. Let’s look back at the past twelve times we were introduced to a Doctor and see how they hold up in celebration of this upcoming era-

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A reduxed review of the Girl Who Waited

Hello, my old nemesis. For anyone who doesn’t know, this one episode of Doctor Who has bothered me since it first aired. As a kid I found it boring, then when I tried watching it properly I found it absolutely dreadful. It was contrived, boring and lazy and proudly became my least favourite episode. At least that’s what I thought when I was younger. Having not seen the episode in a few years, I decided to watch it again, with the assumption that it was a good episode I was too stupid to understand. I must thank the Twelfth Doctor era first of all for giving me several new choices for worst episode ever, making me view every Eleventh Doctor episode I didn’t like (except the stupid tree episode) in a much better light, including this one. Having now watched The Girl Who Waited again, my final thoughts are…

Yeah, it’s pretty good.

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50 Greatest New Series scenes- Part One

Series 11 is coming. A new Doctor, a new era. Now is the time to look back on the brilliance of the past 13 years, which has encompassed four Doctors and ten seasons. Whilst I could discuss the best episodes, that would be harder than this list, so let’s look at the best moments of the revived show. With over a hundred episodes to choose from, picking 50 was hard. I’ve decided to limit the list to one moment per story, and to leave the quality of the episode aside to focus on the moment in question. There’s too much to go through, so I’ve split the list up-

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How a Skulduggery Pleasant film can work

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Next month sees the release of Skulduggery Pleasant: Midnight, and I’m naturally very excited. After a year away from my favourite book series, it’s great to return and see what new threats await Skulduggery and Valkyrie. I can also use this opportunity to think about the inevitable film adaptation. At the moment, there really isn’t a major book series that is on the screen, and Skulduggery Pleasant is a perfect series to bring to film. But how would I do it? Well, let’s assume that I control who is going to work on the film and dive straight in-

In terms of behind the scenes, there is one person who is absolutely vital, and that is Derek Landy himself. He once refused a film adaptation of the series because of the poor quality of the script (it had Skulduggery singing. Urgh) and it’s clear that he’ll be heavily involved in the next film attempt. Whilst I don’t think he’ll have time to write it, I think he should remain on as an executive producer- who are actually quite powerful in terms of making a film. He should hold a similar position to JK Rowling for the Harry Potter films and act as an adviser with final say over the production and casting. It is his series after all and I don’t want this to be another Rick Riordan situation where the author has no say in the books. We know what happened then.

This is Greek gods meet Harry Potter! HOW HARD IS THAT TO MESS UP!

Ok, so what studio should have the privilege to have Skulduggery Pleasant as a franchise? Not Disney, they have everything and if they end up with Skulduggery the stupid “Disney pay critics” rubbish will surface and I don’t want this franchise caught up in that. Warner Bros were the ones who tried before and I still think they could pull it off, and I’m not even considering Sony for the obvious fact that they are a terrible company. I don’t know the future of Fox but their poor handling of X-Men films outside of standalones such as Deadpool and Logan and the continued slow death of the Alien franchise makes me uncertain they could manage Skulduggery. Out of the ‘Big Six’, I can see Paramount doing alright with it and Universal could do a great job. They don’t have any major mess ups in terms of franchises (they’ve recovered from Dark Universe) and are doing fine with Jurassic Park. They would deserve Skulduggery Pleasant.

First things first: do not make the first film just to set up sequels. Make the first film good, get an audience, then pitch a sequel. The sequels exist but don’t greenlight the adaptations until the studio are sure they have a successful franchise. That’s the reason why so many franchises fail.

Right, so now we need a director. In my mind, only one director fits Skulduggery Pleasant perfectly, and it’s Guillermo del Toro.

Del Toro is my favourite filmmaker. His films are of the highest quality and always entertain me. Whilst the strength of Pan’s Labyrinth alone should justify why he should make any film, it’s his two Hellboy films that make me want to see his Skulduggery Pleasant. Hellboy is a similar premise done brilliantly, and del Toro is able to make the comic books part of his unique auteur stamp. Hellboy II has action sequences that are similar to scenes in Skulduggery Pleasant, and a franchise based on the fantastical and macabre would be well served under del Toro. I can imagine a darker, more horror based interpretation of the story. There would also be an emphasis on practical effects and stunts, things missing in Hollywood films. Having an award winning filmmaker helm the project would help the studio fund the film too, and hopefully not have too much meddling. Del Toro is also good with casts, and on that subject we turn to casting the principal players. Valkyrie will almost certainly be an open casting for an unknown actor, but Skulduggery Pleasant will probably be a big name who is well loved. Big name? Well loved? How about David Tennant?

One of my favourite Doctors playing one of my favourite characters. Tennant is just perfect for the part. I know he’s not Irish but he’s not English either and had a seamless accent on Doctor Who. I’m pretty sure he can do an accent for Skulduggery too. He can be dramatic, funny and awesome, and if you read any of Skulduggery’s lines in the Tenth Doctor’s manner then you will see why he is an ideal pick. Ideally Skulduggery should be brought to life by amazing motion capture technology. This technique has gone from being a rarity to being used in almost all major films, mostly very well.

Other casting choices I’d like to see happen in future films are John Barrowman, Nathan Fillion or David Harbour as Sanguine, Simon Pegg and Nick Frost as Scapegrace and Thrasher, Benedict Cumberbatch as Erskine Ravel, Idris Elba as Ghastley Bespoke, Stephen Fry as Kenspeckle Grouse and Derek Landy himself as Gordon Edgely. The music should be done by Danny Elfman or Marco Beltrami.

I don’t really have any ideas about the rest of the characters, although they should all be Irish or British, unless they are specifically stated to not be (such as Sanguine and Scarab). The cast will probably not be too expensive as the studio will not risk a big budget flop. Have a modest budget as the first book is a mystery with action in so it doesn’t need to be too expensive or full of explosions and CGI.  Release it in September or February, two months that have had proven success in recent times (Deadpool, LEGO Batman, Get Out, It and Black Panther) and also away from competition and the living hell that is non-Marvel blockbusters and the pain of Oscar season. Market it well and use the star power of the behind the scenes crew and- bam! A solid opening weekend, positive word of mouth and loyalty to the book series making both fans and casual audiences happy causes a strong box office. Guillermo del Toro continues to rule Hollywood, David Tennant becomes a major film star and Derek Landy’s books gain a whole new audience. Universal now have a franchise.

Of course, that’s probably not going to happen. Regardless, I think this is the best possible way for a Skulduggery Pleasant film franchise. Derek Landy has stated a film won’t happen until he is fully satisfied with what Hollywood is offering him, so until he is I’m happy with the books. I would love to see this amazing series on the big screen, but I don’t want it being bad either. Of course, a film isn’t the only option- a Sherlock style TV show would work, as would a show on streaming. Whatever happens, I will be there supporting it.