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Category Archives: Comics

What I’m looking forward to in 2019

Another year done and dusted- and what a year it’s been for nerdom. A new Doctor arrived, Thanos killed half the universe (SPOILER ALERT for the three people who don’t know), the Skeleton Detective got political and del Toro won his Oscar. 2019 promises to be huge, so without further ado it’s time to reveal what I am looking forward this year in terms of films, television shows and books. We are returning to Hawkins, visiting our favourite drunk reality jumping cynical genius once again, travelling to a galaxy far far away and the most underrated comic book hero of all time is getting a new coat of red. 2019 is going to be huge.

Whilst the Doctor takes yet another hiatus for no reason other than the fact that the BBC cannot schedule their own programmes correctly let’s see what else the year has to offer.

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Aquaman review- The King of Atlantis gets a film worthy of the throne

For over seventy years Aquaman has been DC’s resident joke character. Thanks to some silly interpretations and the cheesy nature of the early comics the character, despite being one of the founding members of the Justice League and a constant in pretty much every lineup, has been seen in pop culture as “the fish dude”. This is in spite of his rich mythology and rebrand as a fighter and a warrior in the New 52. One of my primary concerns about the DCEU tackling Aquaman was built on the awkward attempts to make everything ultra serious yet still trying to make Aquaman a joke- in Justice League he made no impact as he simply stood around making jokes about how he talks to fish whilst the film tried desperately hard to make the audience take this inherently silly character seriously. It just didn’t mesh well. Jason Momoa was a good choice for the character but unless Aquaman’s world was treated with respect he simply wouldn’t translate well to the big screen. Well, the fears have been washed away (ooh, water puns, how original) by James Wan’s brilliant film that embraces the comic book campiness and adventurous tone of films such as Raiders of the Lost Ark whilst balancing it out with actual respect for the mythology and world building, creating a film that’s both immensely fun yet also being quite serious. See DC, this is what you should have been doing from the start!

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Five Marvel characters that would make great Netflix shows

It’s no secret that Marvel rules the silver screen. With the interlocked Marvel Cinematic Universe dominating cinemas, it’s easy to forget the Marvel TV shows, especially when the films themselves do. Since 2015 Netflix has been producing shows based on Marvel comics, intended for an older audience. These shows are dark, gritty and suited to the more adult material that Netflix produces. Launching off the success of Daredevil, the Netflix shows have become a universe in their own right. Jessica Jones, Luke Cage and Iron Fist came soon after, with The Defenders crossover and The Punisher quickly joining them. However I think I speak for a lot of people when I say that the shows are all the same- a gritty anti-hero lives in New York following “the Incident”. The first half has them slowly unravel a conspiracy with the main villain revealing themselves about halfway through and there’s a hallway fight somewhere because of course there is. There is angst, violence, flashbacks and subplots galore. I’m not saying the shows are bad (I haven’t even seen Iron Fist, Luke Cage, Punisher or The Defenders as I’m just not interested) but they are all in the same mould and to be honest, it’s getting a bit tiresome and I don’t find the heroes that interesting. Iron Fist has just been cancelled and I don’t see how the shows can survive without variety in the kind of heroes they focus on. Daredevil Season 3 comes out today, and whilst the show will continue to be outstanding, the Netflix shows as a whole need change and I have five characters who can help with that…

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Why Tim Burton’s Batman Returns is the best Batman film

Yes, you read that right. Tim Burton’s 1992 opus is the finest cinematic offering the Dark Knight has had. It’s not even close. Sure, Nolan’s Batman films (well, the first two) are great films, and it’s true Burton’s original 1989 film started the modern superhero scene as we know it… but it’s his sequel that captures his eccentricity and his genius, takes the Batman mythos in the darkest, most unique direction possible and stands as one of the finest comic book movies ever. In honour of the fifth International Batman Day, let’s take a look at Burton’s classic film and why it is so utterly brilliant.

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My ten favourite characters

In fiction, there are characters who speak to you, and characters who enthrall you. As a devourer of pop culture I have witnessed the stories of countless characters, and assembling a list of my favourites was hard. Do I include Tim Burton’s musically inclined skeleton Jack Skellington? The hilariously witty Ian Malcolm? The pop culture juggernaut Batman? The morally complex V? The smug wit and hilarity of Arnold Rimmer? After much deliberation, I have finally got a list together, encompassing some of my favourite films, TV shows and books. Let’s start with the greatest comedy character of all time-

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Avengers: Infinity War review- The most ambitious film since Return of the King

After 10 years, 18 films, 15 directors and countless heroes, Avengers: Infinity War is finally here. The amount of hype for this film is huge, as we have the culmination of the most ambitious film endeavour since the Lord of the Rings, if not even more ambitious. Does it live up to the hype? In short, with as little spoilers as possible, no.

Oh who am I kidding, yes, yes it does.

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Why I want the DCEU to succeed – and how it can

Yes, I’m doing this a week before Infinity War comes out. Because why not? In all honesty, I think this is a good time to look at the other massive comic book company (I won’t say “rival”, as Marvel and DC love the existence of each other, frequently sharing writers, artists and ideas). DC is the older, prestigious and more interesting neighbour to Marvel, yet for some reason their films have fallen behind the juggernaut that is the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Why? Warner Bros have all the characters, over 70 years of backstory and some of the most iconic characters in pop culture. How have they messed this up to the point Black Panther outgrossed the Justice League?

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What are Black Panther’s Oscar chances?

Black Panther is a phenomenon. This isn’t just a superhero film, this is a cultural statement, a message to the world, and easily one of Marvel’s best and most successful films. In just over a month, Infinity War comes out, and it’s a testament to Black Panther that the epic culmination of ten years that involves the Avengers battling Thanos is the one that must be better than the King of Wakanda. Ten years ago, Marvel probably wouldn’t dream of even getting nominated, but Black Panther’s unprecedented success has many people wondering if this is the year the barriers are truly shattered and Black Panther gets recognition from the Oscars. I’m not just talking technical, I’m talking Best Picture here. Could it happen? It’s actually more likely than usual. Let’s look at the case for-

What’s different this time?

The Academy has changed. When Christopher Nolan’s 2008 masterpiece The Dark Knight failed to get a Best Picture nomination despite being hailed as one of the best films of the 21st century, the Academy Awards expanded the Best Picture slot to ten. This has helped films such as District 9, Up, Toy Story 3, Mad Max Fury Road, The Martian, Arrival and Get Out to get nominated (all very worthy nominations for great films, may I add.) Whilst there were only nine films this year up for nominations (seriously, couldn’t they have nominated Logan or Blade Runner 2049?) the field is open for a superhero film. So why wasn’t The Winter Soldier, another acclaimed Marvel film, or Wonder Woman, another cultural milestone, or Logan, held up as the best superhero film since 2008, up for grabs? Let’s take a look at those in order-

Fellow MCU film The Winter Soldier has similarities to Black Panther- a more serious tone, relevant themes and a great and engaging plot. However, the issue lies with the franchising. In order to appreciate The Winter Soldier, you have to be aware of Captain America as a character and his arc in both his first film and The Avengers. The film has many supporting characters from the MCU film such as Nick Fury and Black Widow and the plot of the film revolves around events that tie into the wider universe. The film is unquestionably a franchise film, and the Academy don’t tend to go for sequels anyway. Black Panther on the other hand is a standalone film that requires no knowledge of the other Marvel films. Wakanda is a detailed world in and of itself and the film more than holds up as a singular superhero film. This is a key reason why I think it’ll be nominated.

OK, so what about the crown jewel of non-Nolan DC films? Why do I think Black Panther will get nominated over Wonder Woman? Make no mistake, Wonder Woman was a phenomenon as well and has just as much to say as Black Panther does about society both then and now, however there are two factors that Black Panther has over Wonder Woman. Firstly, as much as Wonder Woman is acclaimed, nearly everyone, myself included, agree that the third act where Ares reveals himself and the explosions begin is weaker than the outstanding first two acts. It’s not bad, but kinda cliche, especially when he starts to turn himself into a CGI demon. In contrast, Erik Killmonger is held up as the best part of Black Panther, and the third act does not stumble in the way Wonder Woman’s does. Another factor is the release of Justice League, which had Wonder Woman as a central character. I enjoyed the film, but it was hated by critics and failed at the box office, all the while Academy voters were preparing themselves to vote. Could the failure of Justice League have contributed to Wonder Woman’s Oscar snubs? More than likely. Infinity War  is set to smash all box office records and will almost certainly receive acclaim, and even if Ant-Man 2 isn’t good (which I doubt it will be), that won’t affect Black Panther’s Oscar chances. I think fate is on Wakanda’s side.

This brings us to Logan, the only superhero film to ever be nominated for a screenplay award and one of this year’s major snubs. Yes, a writing award is great but the acting deserved recognition, especially from Patrick Stewart. With that aside, people have been saying that Logan’s inability to get a Best Picture award means Black Panther cannot get one. It’s true that Logan’s wildly different tone and themes from most superhero films made it a prime award nominee, and Black Panther is more in line with the Marvel films and is ostensibly a superhero film, whereas Logan is more of a character driven western, but Black Panther has one thing Logan doesn’t- it has the cultural impact. Logan was widely praised and adored but Black Panther is a phenomenon and has taken the world by storm. It is a hugely important films for many reasons and has something to say about the current state of world politics. It has outgrossed most Best Picture winners combined and has made a massive cultural and social impact. What do The Wizard of Oz, Jaws, Star Wars, Raiders of the Lost Ark, ET and Return of the King have in common aside from being blockbusters? They were all massively successful films that became events, which were rewarded with Best Picture nominations. Do the Academy really want to miss out on what is likely to be the biggest cultural event of the year that is causing Infinity War to look small by comparison? It’ll certainly boost the viewing figures.

Hey, if this can be nominated for an Oscar over LEGO BATMAN (!), then anything can.

There’s precedent for films like Black Panther being nominated. It’s obviously political so there’s that going for it (although I would like to think it got nominated for its own merits and not just to score points) and has a lot to say about the world currently. The release date isn’t really an issue, as Oscar-bait is slowly dying and more interesting films are taking over. Just this year Get Out, a satirical horror film about race relations released in February won Best Original Screenplay and was nominated for three more including Best Picture. The Best Picture winner is a love story between a fish man and a mute woman and is ostensibly a fantasy film directed by Guillermo del Toro, who specialises in speculative fiction. There is a high chance that Black Panther can not only be nominated, but win. It all depends on what else comes out though, although I guarantee that none will have the cultural impact of Black Panther. Ryan Coogler and Kevin Feige have a winner here- and it’s here to stay. Logan broke the screenplay barrier, now it’s time for the King of Wakanda to take one for the team and ride the Oscar glory.

Black panther review- You’ve never seen a superhero film like this

It’s only February, but Marvel have wasted no time in giving the world the first superhero film of the year, and it’s set a huge bar for the rest of the year. Considering Infinity War is next, you’d think Black Panther would mainly act as an excuse to set it up, but I was surprised at just how different and standalone this film was in relation to the rest of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Yes, the awesome intro is there, Stan Lee has his usual hilarious one-liner and there are after credits scenes but for the most part Black Panther is the most unique and out there Marvel film. You’ll never see a blockbuster or superhero film like it. This movie serves as a massive statement to critics who complain about all superhero films being the same- I dare the superhero cynics to find another mainstream blockbuster film that features a mainly black cast which serves as a celebration of African culture whilst also dealing with Shakespearean ideals about loyalty, disillusionment, identity and colonialism, tackles modern day issues such as immigration and inequality, has an utterly unique, Oscar-worthy visual design and world building that presents a fully detailed country with its own laws and customs which also happens to be plain fun (Black Panther 2 won’t count). Until there’s another one, I’m going to assume those critics have no idea what they’re talking about.

 

As the film’s been out in most countries for about a week and it’s been released in America now, I will be spoiling the film, although not massively.

Continuing on from his awesome introduction and arc in Civil War, T’Challa/Black Panther/The coolest character in the MCU returns home to Wakanda to be crowed king. Things are not so easy though, as he soon gets involved in a global plot which revolves around vibranium smuggling, the return of Ulysses Klaw and a threat to the throne of Wakanda. Already the film sets itself apart from the rest of Marvel by having a relativity contained plot- after the awesome action scene in South Korea (Marvel really loves filming there) the rest of the film is set entirely in Wakanda and has very personal stakes. But the uniqueness doesn’t end there, as this is a very thematic and dramatic film a world away from the buddy comedy of Thor: Ragnarok. Through the different tribes of Wakanda, incredibly topical issues are raised that are very relevant for today’s world. T’Challa believes in Wakanda’s isolation as he does not want the resources of his country being taken away by foreign powers like the rest of Africa, but at the same time he rules the most technologically advanced nation on the planet and believes this to be the right way, leaving the rest of the world behind to face their own problems. W’Kabi fears that Wakanda’s involvement in world affairs will bring unneeded immigration and integration, which risks Wakanda being just another country and Killmonger believes that Wakanda should be the leaders of the world and that it is justified, seeing how Western cultures took over Africa during the 19th century and how black people have been treated even now. His motivations make absolute sense. I was very surprised as to how political this movie was, but it wasn’t done in a hamfisted or preachy manner. It enhanced the film and made it a lot more complex than the usual blockbuster.

Speaking of Killmonger, he’s probably the best villain Marvel has ever done. Like Loki, he is a very complex and interesting character who opposes the hero in a far more interesting manner than just being evil. His motivations make total sense, his actions are justified and he gets a complete character arc which is immensely satisfying to watch. There’s also the return of Ulyssess Klaw, who is great fun to watch. The film’s villains are all great and Marvel have definitely improved on this front. This bodes well for Thanos. A great villain is nothing without a great hero, but fortunately Black Panther is an awesome character. He commands the screen every second he is on screen and in his solo film he is perhaps even more well thought out than his amazing introduction in Civil War. He is a hero who doesn’t see himself as one and definetly doesn’t see himself as a superhero, yet his actions and character are all heroic. He’s become one of my favourite Marvel heroes as he isn’t afraid to make mistakes and even do things that antagonise others, as long as it’s in the service of his goals.

The world of Wakanda and the highly unique style this film has is simply amazing. The film combines futuristic technology with African culture, and it’s so interesting to watch. Marvel have successfully made politics interesting- albeit the politics of a fictional nation which seems a lot cooler and a lot more well run than most countries today. That’s kind of the point though, as fear of expanding and helping others is one of the main conflicts of the film. For all the wider themes at play, this is still a comic book film, and the action is amazing. The fighting is very intense and quite different from the usual Marvel action and it reminded me in places of a 12-rated Logan. The final battle is also awesome and the film is never boring, always offering up something new and interesting. The links to the wider MCU are very thin, with only Klaw, minor references to Civil War and a hilarious Martin Freeman as Everett Ross offering wider links to the universe. I appreciate this though, as being bogged down in references would have alienated casual audiences. The standalone nature gives Ryan Coogler to tell his own story and put a unique stamp on Marvel, which he has done immensely well. As much as I am looking forward to Infinity War, I am desperate for a Black Panther sequel to return to this unique world.

In conclusion, I highly reccomend Black Panther, even if you are not a huge superhero fan. It’s different enough to stand on its own and it has a lot to say about race, diversity and building relationships, very relevant in today’s world. It’s one of Marvel’s best films and I wouldn’t be surprised if there’s at least a bit of recognition from next year’s Oscars for this film. Next up, it’s a film ten years in the making- Infinity War. April can’t come soon enough.

The superhero films of the year- A look back

With the release of Justice League this past week, the annual bunch of superhero films has come to an end. And what a year it has been for Marvel and DC! Two Batmen, Wonder Woman, Spider-Man, Thor, Wolverine, Baby Groot and more. To me, this has been an outstanding year for comic book movies, so let’s go through one of the craziest, most insane years in superhero film history. We’ll start from the beginning, and there will be spoilers for all movies apart from Justice League and Thor: Ragnarok-

Way back in February, we had the hilarious LEGO Batman Movie. I haven’t seen the LEGO Movie, although I’ve heard it’s good and based on this movie, I will be first in line to the sequel (I’m also hoping for the Doctor to appear in that film). This is a great, fun film for fans of LEGO, DC and good movies. I honestly didn’t expect to love the movie as much as I did.

This movie homages and references all eras of Batman, from the 30’s to Batman V Superman. This Batman is absolutely hilarious, less of a Dark Knight and more of a spoilt rich kid who happens to be a superhero. In the first case of “superhero father problems” this year, Batman has to learn to raise the orphan Dick Grayson as his own son whilst also having to fight off the Joker, whose attempts to get Batman to notice him causes him to ally himself with every villain from every franchise Warner Bros can get their hands on. Behold, as we see Voldemort, Sauron, King Kong, Daleks and more team up with the Joker to invade Gotham City. The results are glorious-

This movie is just awesome. It contains so many references and in-jokes to over 75 years of Batman that I just couldn’t help but love every second of it. This is the first Batman film to have the Bat Family, the first to have Condiment King and the first (and only I think) to have the shark from Jaws defeated by Bat Spray. A great start to a great year of comic book movies.

And now for something completely different in the best comic book film of the year, Logan.

I saw this movie and the LEGO Batman movie less than a month apart. The difference could not be bigger and it’s a testament to the diversity of comic book films that these two movies exist in the same year, let alone a month apart from each other. I’ve gone on about how this movie deserves serious consideration at this year’s Oscars and I still haven’t thought of a single legitimate reason why it wouldn’t. In terms of final bows, I can think of nothing better than Hugh Jackman playing Wolverine for one last time. Please Fox, don’t recast him, just leave this chapter of comic book history alone.

In part two of “superhero father problems” (yes I did just link the LEGO Batman Movie and Logan), an ageing Logan has to care for a dying Professor X in the near future, in the same way Xavier used to care for him. The daddy issues truly come to ahead when Logan ends up on the run with Laura, a young girl who happens to be a genetic clone of Wolverine. Logan now has to care for his “father” and make his “daughter” a better person than him, all the while escaping from the Ravagers. This is easily the darkest and least comic book like superhero film since The Dark Knight and is more like a western character study which happens to have a clawed mutant. This movie delves deep into themes such as redemption and what it means to have a family, and juxtaposes some of the best action scenes I’ve ever seen with complex character dynamics and moments of quiet.

Give. Patrick Stewart. An Oscar. Comic book films honestly don’t get better than this, and I honestly think this should be the last X-Men film (barring Deadpool films, but they’re allowed to exist because they’re Deadpool films). To end one of the oldest ongoing comic book franchises on this note will be so much better than the next continuity confusing X-Men movie. Seriously, the timeline is so confusing and whilst it’s not clear what timeline Logan is set it, I don’t really care seeing how this is a standalone film. The best comic book film this year, no question, and I expect to see this movie reap in many nominations come Oscars season.

Moving on to the giants of superhero movies, the Marvel Cinematic Universe-

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 is the third part of the unofficial quadrilogy of 2017 superhero films about problematic fathers, and it’s the movie most obviously about the issue. The second Guardians film is a joy to watch, filled with fantastic comedy and great character growth. I’ve touched upon why I love this film previously, but since May I’ve grown to love the film even more, to the point where I love it more than the first film and it’s now one of my favourite MCU films.

This movie has one of the most emotional and powerful stories in the whole MCU, with Star Lord coming to terms with his father and completing his emotional journey across two films. The Guardians go through a lot in this film and whilst they come out on top, their world will never be the same again. Seeing all the arcs and subplots come together in the final act is immensely satisfying. This film is about belonging somewhere and embracing family. Ego is one of Marvel’s best villains, brilliantly playing off Star Lord and giving the movie a sense of real menace. The plot with Rocket and Yondu is my favourite part of the film, as they bond over their reluctance and then acceptance of fatherhood (Rocket with Baby Groot and Yondu with Star Lord).

This is a truly well written and complex movie with every character’s arcs tying into some way about the idea of family, friendship and trust. However, this is still a movie with a talking raccoon, a tiny dancing tree and Taserface, so it’s not all doom and gloom. But it’s the way the hilarious comedy is weaved together with this brilliant story that makes this one of Marvel’s absolute best. I do love the first film, but I honestly believe this film surpasses it in every way. A triumph.

And with that, we move onto the movie I’m so happy ended up being so good, Wonder Woman-

Oh DC, DC, where do we start with DC? I’ll go into their current predicament later, but for now let’s cast our minds back to June, when DC made a movie everyone could agree was good. I honestly prefer DC to Marvel overall (I’ll happily read a Green Lantern comic over any Avengers comic) and I only really like the Marvel characters in movie form. DC on the characters have characters I unreservedly love, especially the Justice League. So I was happy when Wonder Woman was great, as it was such a breath of fresh air for the DCEU movies. I didn’t hate the other films, but this movie was clearly superior to the others.

What this movie nails most of all is how to embrace the silly comic book roots whilst also dealing with incredibly dark themes and ideas. This movie is all about war and it doesn’t sugarcoat it in any way- Diana sees first-hand the horrors of the First World War and has her optimistic view of the world of man shattered. The movie also deals with the idea that humanity is flawed, which is something that Diana fails to grasp, as she sees defeating Ares as the key to ending the war, only to realise it is the humans causing the war with Ares merely guiding them. A lesser movie would have painted the conflict in black and white but Wonder Woman is all about what war really is, as anyone who knows history knows the First World War was far more complex than just good vs evil. It’s a really mature story but at the same time it embraces the comic book roots and has delightfully over the top action and effects. The No Man’s Land scene is, in my opinion, the absolute best scene in any comic book movie this year-

What a scene. I hope future movies write female characters in this way- make them strong because of who they are, not based on their gender (this applies to male characters too). This film could have easily been about how Wonder Woman is awesome because she’s a woman, but instead she’s awesome because of who she is and what she values. Ares is a great villain and I love how the film misdirects the audience into thinking it’s Luddendorf (who was actually a real person whadyya know?) before revealing the much more satisfying and thematically profound answer. This movie embodies who Wonder Woman is and why DC has endured for so long. If it wasn’t for Logan, this would be my favourite film of the year.

Moving on to the most iconic Marvel character, Spider-Man-

Remember how I said I mostly prefer Marvel characters in film form? That’s not the case for Spider-Man. I’m a huge fan of the comic book character, especially the original Stan Lee run. They’re incredibly cheesy but heartfelt and genuine, which is something this movie captures well. One of the highlights of Civil War, it was great to see a fully established Spider-Man and not having to go through the origin again. In Uncle Ben’s place we have Iron Man, whose role as a surrogate father figure and his clashes with Peter make this part four of superhero dads. This Spider-Man is just a normal kid, which I really appreciate, as it’s how the character started.

What works about this movie is how small scale it is. The world is not at stake and it’s not a part of the ongoing Thanos saga- it’s just a standalone film about a kid who wants to be a hero. The small stakes allow the villain to work- and I mean really work. The Vulture looks awesome, is awesome and is the best comic book villain of the year. You understand where he is coming from and why he’s doing what he’s doing, which is not something I can say for a lot of Marvel villains. In terms of characterisation, this Spider-Man is probably the closest we have to Stan Lee’s original vision and it’s great to see the MCU stripped down to Earth. In terms of past Spider-Man films this is very unique as it deals with issues not faced by the other ones, especially seeing how the MCU’s desperately wants to join the Avengers.

This is probably my second favourite Spider-Man film after Spider-Man 2 (which to be fair is a very high bar to reach) and it captures the care free nature of the comic so well. I particularly like the action scenes, as they feel really cartoony and ridiculous, which is what a Spider-Man film should be. I also love how Spider-Man leaves the Vulture alive, setting up not only a possible reunion but also a possible Sinister Six film. It’s also a really funny film, with lots of great laughs. And it’s not even the funniest Marvel film this year! But most importantly, much like Wonder Woman it captures who the main character is perfectly. I still love the original Sam Raimi Spider-Man films more (well, the first two), but this Spider-Man is my favourite. If that makes any sense.

And now to my favourite Marvel character, Thor-

I’ve written a review for this as my last post so I’ll keep it brief- this was my most anticipated movie of the year and it did not disappoint. Everything I want from a Thor movie is here and more. Every character is awesome, with the highlights being Korg (spin-off please!), Valkyrie and the Grandmaster. Thor is as funny as he always is, Hulk is great in a movie that shouldn’t really have him in it, and Loki is just Loki. Even Doctor Strange is awesome for the brief time he’s on screen. Incidentally, both Thor and Doctor Strange are Marvel characters who, like Spider-Man, I love the comics for as well. It’s also so, so funny- as in laugh a minute. It has amazing action, great character development and is the ultimate comic book blast. I can’t really dive into this one seeing how it’s still fairly recent but if you haven’t seen it yet, there’s still time. In short- watch it. Can’t wait for Black Panther and then… Infinity War.

And now for the elephant in the room, Justice League. This movie is causing quite a stir so let’s dive straight into this-

OK, this will be less about the film itself and more to do with the fallout after this movie’s poor box office. Firstly, I’m going to come out and say that I actually like this film. Admittedly it’s mainly because Wonder Woman’s in it and I really like this universe’s Batman now that he doesn’t kill people. Seeing the Justice League together was really cool and I’m glad Superman is actually Superman. The only character I wasn’t too keen on was Aquaman, as I think he was too similar to Thor in terms of personality and didn’t really resemble the comic book character. He could have been any hero. The villain wasn’t too great but overall I still enjoyed watching it. That said…

Let’s talk about the future of the DCEU and how they can improve. At this point the movie is severely under performing at the box office, causing mass panic for Warner Bros. It isn’t superhero fatigue (a term coined by cynical art-house critics; the other six films this year have all performed brilliantly) but mostly due to a lack of faith in DC properties and the mixed reviews. Whilst I basically ignore reviews for superhero films, a lot of people don’t and that has clearly affected Justice League- Wonder Woman was a success due to the positive reviews and its standalone nature, whilst Justice League has the highly divisive Batman V Superman in its shadow.

So what’s the future for DC? I don’t see Wonder Woman 2 being affected seeing how that’s the only successful franchise they have right now. Aquaman is still being released and depending on how successful that is we may have another hit franchise. As for the rest, I think Warner Bros honestly need to step back and think about this carefully. Personally, I would use Flashpoint to restart the universe, keeping everything that works (Wonder Woman) and changing everything else. Start the universe with a Wonder Woman film with the same continuity as her previous films, then do solo films for each Justice League member with the team up film simply called Trinity. I mean, they could make do with the current universe, but the fans have spoken and as a DC fan, I think a fresh start is in order. That said I still enjoyed this version of the Justice League, but I can’t see the current DCEU surviving outside of Wonder Woman.

So after this great year of comic book movies, I honestly think this has been the best year for fandom in ages. Marvel and DC were both on their best and I watched and enjoyed all the films. Next year is set to be even more nuts and if the quality of superhero films can keep up then we’re in for a good year. All we need is The Last Jedi and a good Doctor Who Christmas special to cap this year off in style.