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My Cornish holiday

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This week, I had a holiday in Cornwall. It was a great and unique experience which I really enjoyed. Cornwall is a very interesting place with some complex history linking back to the Celts, and I loved learning about it and experiencing Cornish life.

We stayed in a B&B near Par, a small village near the largest town, St Austell. On the first evening, the village seemed pretty lifeless and quite deserted, with no nightlife to speak of. This was probably because it was early evening when we arrived. We never spent much time in Par, as we went to other towns around Cornwall.

On the next day, Tuesday, we went to Truro, the capital city. It was quite big and modern but there wasn’t much there except for shops.

Truro Cathedral was very large and interesting and contained a lot of background information concerning Cornwall’s links to the rest of the UK. The first Bishop of Truro, Edward White Benson, became Archbishop of Canterbury. The cathedral has launched a sign-a-slate appeal to fund £3.2 million roof repair. Despite the cathedral being great, I felt that the rest of the city was just like any other English city. Thankfully there was pizza to satisfy me. Truro did have a very impressive library though, and I spent about half an hour exploring it.

Royal Cornwall Museum

Royal Cornwall Museum

Truro also had a museum called Royal Cornwall Museum, but I didn’t find it that interesting. It had information about the history of Cornwall, geology, and a section detailing the impact of tourism on Cornwall, which was quite interesting, but I felt the rest of the museum was quite bland. There were many exhibitions in the museum, and one section mentioned monsters. It was very good but there wasn’t enough of the museum dedicated to it.

Stories of monsters in the Cornwall Museum.

Stories of monsters in the Cornwall Museum.

The following day we went to the Eden Project, Cornwall’s famous nature reserve. I believe it was worth the hype, as the rainforest biome was huge and impressive.

The very impressive Eden Project

The very impressive Eden Project

There were many plants and trees from rainforests all over the world, from Southeast Asia to South America. The highlight of the trip was a tall walkway called Rainforest Canopy Walkway, which ended with a platform that had an aerial view of the whole dome, which had spectacular views. While we were walking on the steps, it was very wobbly and the atmosphere was humid. We were warned that some people might be vulnerable to the heat, but I’ve stayed in Singapore and Malaysia before so I was fine.

Rainforest Canopy Walkway - the temperature is high. At Eden Project.

Rainforest Canopy Walkway – the temperature is high.

Rainforest Canopy Walkway at Eden Project - breathtaking views.

Rainforest Canopy Walkway at Eden Project – breathtaking views.

View from the top of Rainforest Canopy Walkway at Eden Project.

View from the top of Rainforest Canopy Walkway at Eden Project.

The other dome was the much smaller Mediterranean dome, which was about plants from the Mediterranean. Both domes were really insightful and raised concerns about the environment. I learnt a lot from the Eden Project.

The Mediterranean Dome at Eden Project.

The Mediterranean Dome at Eden Project.

Flowers at the Mediterranean Dome at Eden Project.

Flowers at the Mediterranean Dome at Eden Project.

There is a gigantic WEEE Man at  the Eden Project. The WEEE Man waste sculpture “represents the amount of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) the average British household throws away in a lifetime.”

The WEEE Man is a 3.3-tonne structure - Eden Project.

The WEEE Man is a 3.3-tonne structure – Eden Project.

WEEE Man waste sculpture is made up of electrical equipment.

WEEE Man waste sculpture is made up of electrical equipment.

WEEE Man is a monster. Eden Project. Cornwall.

WEEE Man is a bit of a monster.

In the evening, we went to Charlestown, where bits of the Pirates of the Caribbean movies were filmed. We saw an old fashion boat in the docks and nearly witnessed a crash when the rope snapped and the boat continued drifting along the river. Fortunately they were able to secure the boat. The town itself is very old fashioned and small, with lots of birds. There was a great beach with a cave in it, which we explored. Unfortunately it was incredibly windy the whole time, so luckily there were restaurants and shops to protect us from the cold.

Charlestown, Cornwall.

Charlestown, Cornwall.

Charlestown Cornwall image.

This old ship got into some problems. At Charlestown, Cornwall.

This old ship got into some problems.

The last day took us all the way to Penzance, the southernmost large town in the country. We walked to St Michael’s Mount near Marazion as the tide was low and we could reach the island by foot. We walked for about an hour to get there from Penzance station and the sea view was spectacular. There were walkers, and also some people riding horses.

We were walking towards St. Michael's Mount, Cornwall. People were riding their horses on the beach too.

We were walking towards St. Michael’s Mount, Cornwall. People were riding their horses on the beach too.

We walked for an hour to get to St. Michael's Mount, Cornwall.

We walked for an hour to get to St. Michael’s Mount, Cornwall.

St. Michael's Mount, Cornwall.

St. Michael’s Mount, Cornwall.

The island has a fantastic castle. On the outside, it looks like a place from a fantasy story, but the castle itself is quite modern on the inside with in depth history around it. The Queen and Prince Charles visited the castle before and I can see why.

Views from St. Michael's Mount, Cornwall.

Views from St. Michael’s Mount, Cornwall.

Stunning view from St. Michael's Mount in Cornwall.

Stunning view from St. Michael’s Mount in Cornwall.

The gardens looked great, but they weren’t open until next week. The island is the subject of a legend, Jack the Giant Killer. In the 6th century, there was a giant that lived on the island and ate children and cattle. A farmer boy named Jack trapped him in a pit and killed him. The whole experience at St Micheal’s Mount was very interesting and learning the mythology of the place was eye-opening.

The castle was made out of corks of champagne bottles by a butler.

The castle was made out of corks of champagne bottles by a butler.

Castle made from corks St Michael's Mount Cornwall

There was also a 3D model of the castle made by the butler using champagne corks. I found this pretty cool. What compelled the butler to do this? Was he so bored he just grabbed lots of corks and squashed them together.

After the visit, we had to take the boat back to Marazion because the tide made the walkway flooded. It reminded me of my trip to Ubin Island in Singapore last summer.

We took the boat back to the town as the castle was cut off by the tides.

We took the boat back to the town as the castle was cut off by the tides.

Overall, the trip was great. I learnt a lot about Cornish history and had lots of new experiences. The landscapes were fantastic but unfortunately because it was very muddy, we couldn’t walk everywhere. I didn’t know about St Micheal’s Mount or the importance of the Eden Project before visiting. Cornwall is very different from Hampshire, Wales or London, and it made me realise that the UK is huge and varied. I would love to visit again.

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About epicduda

I'm 16 years old. I like animals, lasagne, comic books, films, role-playing games and Doctor Who. I write cool stuff - Doctor Who, science fiction, film reviews, and quirks about Britain. I have a blue-tongued skink called Georgy and a cat called Billy.

3 responses »

  1. Graham Williams

    The Eden Project is on my bucket list, so I was really interested to hear your opinion. Glad you enjoyed the trip.

    Reply
  2. Helen Williams

    I’ve never been to Cornwall, but would love to go. John worked in Truro for six weeks before coming out to Munich, and he says it’s one of his favourite places in the UK. I’ve been reading recently about the Danish invasion of Britain in the 9th century, and it’s interesting to learn that Cornwall was considered a different country back then. I guess it’s understandable – it’s a very long journey with modern transport, so back then it miust have seemed like another planet!

    I would also like to visit the Eden Project. It sounds wonderful!

    I’m glad you had a good holiday, and well done for another well-written and informative post.

    Reply
  3. Ben, you always make me feel like I’ve been there. Thanks for taking me away from my little forest in Oregon to explore your world with you. Thanks!

    Reply

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